Maximize Your Performance

These days if your goal is to be successful, it’s all about high performance no matter the profession. There’s actually more pressure on the average human being now than it has ever been with constant reminders that you must not just achieve, but strive for greatness. Messages are being shot at us from every angle – commercials telling us that we must be on top of our game, technology keeping us connected around the clock with our employers, family, friends, and even strangers. Not to mention, our own personal desire to be winners. Our children are even being affected by the unrealistic expectations for excellence that have been defined by our country and put into action by parents, educational institutions, and corporate America alike. Indeed, our society may be more productive in theory, but are we truly maximizing our performance? Or is this approach just smoke and mirrors – creating a formula for dysfunction?

I would suggest that we begin to refocus our goals on what we truly want and look at evaluating our own personal definition of achievement. For some, our motivation may be as simple as just being in charge and calling the shots. Or being able to acquire endless material possessions, or even reaching heights that have seldom been attained by the masses.

But is this what we actually desire?  

Haven’t you ever wondered why so many of us who have scaled the mighty mountain of success don’t seem to really appreciate the accomplishment, not to mention the climb itself? It’s a wonder why, since the cycle of high performance is never ending. One project hasn’t been fully completed before it’s onto the next thing! And if you stumble and fall along the way, the repercussion of the failure reminds you never to stumble again. As a result, we put in place our own personal – and at times dysfunctional – safe guards to ensure our high performance efforts are protected. Each of us has one or more, whether we’re willing to admit it or not.

 Does any of the following sound familiar?

  • Consuming high levels of caffeinated or energy drinks to stay alert and energized
  • Taking sleeping pills to get a decent night’s sleep
  • Popping prescription anxiety or anti-depressant medication, as well as illegal substance to control the brain chatter
  • Chain smoking and/or the over-consumption of alcoholic beverages (even though we know the activities are destroying our internal organs)
  • Extreme workouts (that in some cases cause short and long term injuries)
  • Over or undereating – leading to chronic illnesses and disorders
  • Self-justified bad behavior – angry outbursts, vengefulness, arrogance, manipulation, control, etc.

All for the purpose of being a high performer!

I want to be clear that there’s nothing wrong with striving for excellence. However, when there is a need to institute unhealthy coping mechanisms to be successful and there’s no ability to enjoy what you have earned – your process has failed! A new way of functioning is the only way to truly enjoy the success you’ve worked so hard to attain.

Many of you have heard Oprah Winfrey, Phil Jackson, and Deepak Chopra talk about the powerful benefits of instituting the daily practice of Meditation. Well, it’s true! Meditation can actually change your brain chemistry, creating a more balanced way of processing and functioning in the world. It can help overcome addiction, bad habits, as well as stabilizing mood swings and chronic illnesses. In addition, daily practitioners experience a sense of euphoria, while significantly increasing their clarity, energy level and in some cases mental and physical agility.

From a corporate perspective, it can be used to change the organizational culture. This can be done by creating an atmosphere that motivates and empowers employees to grow both personally and professionally, whereby strengthening the team dynamic, and increasing overall workforce productivity.

Well, you may ask, where do I begin?

I suggest you start by asking yourself a few stirring questions to see if Meditation could be useful, such as: What’s my own personal definition of happiness and based on that definition – Am I happy? Do I like the direction that my life has taken? Do I have the ability to empathize with others or am I completely self-absorbed? Do I spend quality time with my family or friends or do I find excuses to distance myself? How do my employees, teammates, supervisors and contemporaries perceive me? What are the dynamics of my relationships – are they healthy or unhealthy? Do I have high blood pressure, diabetes or other stress related disorders?

If any of these questions resonate, Meditation can help you maximize your overall performance!

 

Here are 6 easy tips to get started:

 

  • Meditation can be done anywhere! The surroundings don’t have to be perfect; it just has to be somewhere you feel comfortable and secure in finding peace and quiet.
  • Set clear intentions– What is causing your anxiety and stress? By setting your intentions before the meditation session you are actually getting clear about what you do or don’t want in your life
  • Practice makes perfect!Like anything else, you have to put the time and energy into your practice of Meditation. If practiced consistently, overtime shifts will naturally come about.
  • Don’t worry about the chatter in your brain– Allow your mind to do whatever comes naturally. Don’t judge or try to control it. With ongoing practice, the chatter will dissipate.
  • Reflect on what your sessions stir up– You’ll acquire an uncanny ability to seamlessly navigate difficulties and rally from missteps seeing things in a clearer prospective.
  • Ride the wave!As Meditation becomes a part of your daily regime, your life will begin to flow in this indescribable rhythm that begins to guide you toward clarity, purpose, and peace.

 

To learn more about the practice of Meditation and how to maximize your performance visit Madison McEwan & Associates at www.madisonmcewanandassociates.com.

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